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The hostile environment of waste management

The hostile environment of waste management

With the waste handling industry growing yearly, control can only be satisfied by increased investment in design, infrastructure and efficiency including the application of door systems says Doug Hart, chairman, Hart Door Systems.

Speaking at the recent Recycling & Waste Management Expo in Birmingham, Mr Hart pointed to the UK’s increasing population together with the growing waste burden “from our throw away culture” as the prime generators of waste.

Citing waste management as a ‘very challenging environment’ the range of issues included spills and debris, frequent traffic movements involving trucks tipping waste and large equipment on site.

“These sites can be rugged to work in with corrosive agents present, large temperature variation, high humidity and vermin. These issues underline the importance of industrial doors to prevent environmental pollution and to contain noise, smell, airborne dust and bird and rodent access,” said Mr Hart.

In this hostile environment waste plants need to be above all compliant to requirements placed by planning authorities and compliant with relevant BS EN health and safety standards.

With experience gained from operational requirements of door systems totalling over 200 doors across more than 20 UK sites, Mr Hart says it is essential for people to work together at the design stage to ensure the reliable interface of doors into the waste management process.

“A whole host of considerations are required such as future maintenance access, the prevention of debris inhibiting or stopping door operation, mechanical protection of systems such as control panels and associated equipment and of course the protection of electrics from humidity, moisture and dust,” says Mr Hart.

“This all comes under the heading of ‘good housekeeping’. As an example we suggest on all proposals that an essential equipment plan is mocked up or drawn and agreed in advance to prevent conflict and additional works later on that lead to delays and additional cost.”